What is Martinus Cosmology? A quick overview for the curious

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In a nutshell

I’m sometimes asked what is Martinus Cosmology and how is it different to other spiritual writings. In a nutshell, Martinus Cosmology is nothing more than the cosmology set out by Danish spiritual writer Martinus (1890-1981). In this usage, “cosmology” means the science or theory of the universe as an ordered whole, and of the general laws which govern it, to follow the definition in the Oxford English Dictionary (second edition). Also, ‘a particular account or system of the universe and its laws’. So Martinus Cosmology is the particular account of the universe given by Martinus.

Quick Overview

At a most basic level, each and every person has their own cosmology. I have my account of the universe, you have yours. This or that scientist, theologian or football player has theirs. It is easy to imagine that some of these accounts of the universe are more detailed and comprehensive, and coherent, than others. It is in this regard that it is best to think of Martinus Cosmology. Martinus went to great lengths to give as detailed an account as he could of the universe that he saw and experienced. What resulted was a complete description of all the basic laws and principles, and all the facts and details, that he saw the universe consisted of. This is Martinus’s “world picture”.

According to this world picture, the universe does not create itself out of nothing. Nor is the universe a purely physical, mechanical entity. It is on the contrary, like we find in many religious accounts, a spiritual universe. However, the description of the universe according to the religious systems is not complete or useful for scienetific purposes, says Martinus. It relies on many outdated concepts and symbols, which are by now less useful. As a result, Martinus set out to create a new picture of the spiritual and physical universe, one that could be relevant for the people of today and that also took in all the details and realities of the modern world. What is more, he felt that there were many aspects of the universe that were not described quite accurately, or well-enough, by this or that religious system. So Martinus’s cosmology set out to address this need.

Martinus Symbol 11 - The Eternal World Picture, the Living Being 2, the Eternal Godhead and the Eternal Sons of God
© Martinus Institut 1981. Reg 11. Martinus Symbol 11 – The Eternal World Picture, the Living Being 2, the Eternal Godhead and the Eternal Sons of God. www.martinus.dk

Martinus’s Innovations

Martinus broke new ground when he published his main and secondary works, including Livets Bog (The Book of Life) (1932-1960) and The Eternal World Picture (1963-1981). First, he created a new language and set of descriptors that could account for what we might call physical and spiritual realities. With new concepts and ways of discussing reality and the universe, people could now talk about spiritual subjects without referring to this or that religion. In this regard, Martinus forms part of that early twentieth-century group of thinkers who paved the way for a spirituality independent of religion, of which we are today the inheritors.

Second, he created a very easy to read symbology. With about one hundred colour and black and white symbols, Martinus illustrated the many principles behind the universe in a way that everybody could understand. In this regard, Martinus made thinking about the universe more accessible. Martinus felt that everybody should be able to engage with high-intellectual thoughts about the deep structure of the universe and that it shouldn’t only be philosophers, mystics and spiritual adepts who should consider such things. Instead, he was much more interested in promoting a more open spirituality, whereby people didn’t have to rely on others for their spiritual nourishment.

Third, Martinus set out to provide a comprehensive world picture; a picture that could include an account of everything from the creation of physical phenomena and consciousness to suffering and joy. He wanted to account for everything we find in life, from abortions to zoos, as well as all the basic principles and processes underpinning the whole universe.

Finally, Martinus wanted to create an eternal world picture, or something that would be as valid today as in a thousand years’ time. In another sense, a picture of the reality of the universe and being that is not only valid for us, but for valid for all beings. Here, Martinus is perhaps offering a candidate for a universal language. Readers will have to determine for themselves whether they feel Martinus has achieved that, and in what ways it could be argued either way. Nevertheless, it was Martinus himself who claimed that his picture of the world was eternally valid.

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